How to Grow Goji Berry Plants

How to grow goji berry plants in your garden

The Lycium barbarum variety of Goji Berry Plants are a perennial in zones 3 to 10, they are actually quite remarkably heat and cold tolerant. Bearing slightly elongated, red fruit, about the size of a raisin, Goji plants are deciduous, which means they drop their leaves every year, usually after the first frost. You can read about pruning below.

Goji Berry plants are very adaptable, but for the very best results, test your soil, and then adjust the pH to between 6.8 – 8.1. You can add lime to raise the pH if necessary or aluminum sulfate to lower it.

GROW GOJI BERRY PLANTS IN CONTAINERS

Gogi Berry plants can easily be grown in containers on your deck or patio. Goji plant roots like to grow deep, but the plant itself will stop growing once the roots touch the bottom of the container, so they won’t grow as large as the plants grow in the ground. One advantage is that you may very well see goji berries in the first or second season, rather than the third, which is normally the case when they are grown in the ground.

It will take approximately 15 plants to feed one person for one year. Nutrition experts recommend eating 10 to 30 grams per day, which equates to about 1/3 to 1 ounce. One ounce is about the size of a single-serve box of raisins.

Your bare root plants will survive for a while without being planted, but we recommend you plant them as soon as possible. We also suggest that you get them established inside, in a sunny location, before moving them outdoors to a sunny location. Your Goji plant will appreciate some afternoon shade if you live in a very hot climate (temps above 100°F).

  • Place the bare root plants in a jar or container with room-temperature water and allow them to soak for about 15-minutes.
  • Prepare your container. We recommend a pot at least as deep as a five-gallon bucket, but it does not have to be wide. Your container or pot should have drainage holes in the bottom (if it doesn’t make some), so you may also want to provide a drain pan for the container to sit in.
  • Mix about 1/3 sand to 2/3 soil in order to provide the best growing medium and drainage, though any good potting soil will work. Fill the container, leaving 2 to 3-inches at the top.
  • Dig a hole in the middle of the container a couple of inches deeper than to the crown of the plant (where the roots meet the stem), pushing loose soil back in until with the roots lightly resting on the soil in the hole, the crown is level with the top of the soil.
  • Push the soil back in, filling around the roots and up to the crown, gently tamping as you go.
  • Water well and push more soil around the plant if necessary, watering again to let the soil settle.
  • You should continue to keep your Goji plant moist, but not overly wet, until you see new growth sprouting, usually in about 2-3 weeks.
  • Apply an inch or two of mulch in order to help with moisture retention (and because it looks nice). If you mulch, you will depend upon touch to check soil moisture, or water into a large reservoir under the planter so it is wicked from the bottom up.

You may see flowers, after which fruit will follow, depending on when you plant. It could be the first season but more than likely it will be the second season. Remember that containerized plants will feel the heat and cold more because their roots are in soil above the ground. Be weather-aware, providing adequate moisture when it is extremely hot and dry, as containerized plants will usually dry out quicker. Provide protection for your plants if the temperatures become really cold.

GROW GOJI BERRY PLANTS IN THE GROUND

You can grow Goji Berry plants in the ground in any relatively sunny location, as long as you have room for expansion. Adult Goji plants can grow up to 8-feet high and wide, though some gardeners prune their Goji plants to keep them within a desired size range. You can even grow Gogi bushes as a hedge or you can train them to a trellis, in which case, they can get as tall as 10-feet.

We recommend you start your Goji plant in a container, though you don’t need a 5-gallon size. In fact, you can buy a 4- to 6-inch peat pot and not even have to worry about taking it out of the pot to transplant it. This will greatly reduce the stress involved with transplanting, further ensuring your Goji plant will thrive. If you are starting it in a container, just follow steps 1 through 7 above, after which point you can transplant your Goji plant into the ground. Goji plants growing in the ground will sometimes start to produce fruit the second season but will not go into full production until the third year.

Unpruned Goji Berry PlantIf you are putting it directly into the ground:

  • Choose a sunny site if you live anywhere but in the desert southwest, where you will either want to have shade or be able to put up a shade cloth during the hottest part of the day.
  • Follow step 1 above, and then prepare your soil, testing and amending it if needed.
  • Mature Goji Berry bushes can reach up to 8 feet high and wide unless they’re regularly pruned, so space accordingly. We recommend not closer than 48 inches between plants and 8 feet between rows.
  • Skip to step 4, and continue through step 8 above, applying mulch immediately, rather than waiting, and carefully monitoring soil moisture. It is critical that it not be allowed to dry out until you see new growth start to sprout, usually in about two weeks.

Once the average daytime temperature drops below 50 degrees, your Goji plant will start going into dormancy. It will stay dormant until the springtime temps are up above 50 degrees. If you live in an area that does not get that cold, keeping your plant pruned back to new growth is the key to keeping the berries coming.

PRUNING YOUR GOJI BERRY PLANTS

Pruning is normally done in the winter, but they can also be gently trimmed throughout the season to shape the canopy and to improve berry yield, though pruning incorrectly or over-pruning can reduce your yield dramatically. It is also important to have the right tool for the job. A dull or inadequate pruner can do more damage than good.

You will not want to prune them heavily the first year. You first need to identify the largest, healthy shoot, which will be the main trunk. Then, gradually remove the lower lateral shoots, with the goal of keeping the trunk clear for the first 15 inches, and then when your Goji plant reaches 24 inches, remove the growing tip to stimulate the growth of additional side branches.

To prune adult plants, just remove the branches above the maximum height you want. You should maintain clearance from the ground up of about 15 inches. You can also identify any ineffective branches. These usually grow very fast, straight and smooth and will not be very productive, so if they aren’t essential to the overall look, they can simply be removed. Goji Berry plants grow similarly to a weeping willow. If allowed to grow un-pruned, you can end up with a mighty wild look.

We hope this has helped you to understand the needs of the Goji berry plant.  Fertilizer is not necessary as excess nitrogen will kill the plants.

For preparing this amazingly healthy superfood, we have discovered a cookbook, Goji Berries :The Ultimate Recipe Guide – Over 30 Delicious & Best Selling Recipes It’s filled with illustrations and recipes for everything from breakfast to main dishes and even includes a chapter on appetizers!

We wish you much planting success and good health! Happy Gardening!

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291 Comments

  • Reply
    Lynn
    March 21, 2012 at 11:43 am

    I have had a Goji Berry Plant in a pot for 3 years. It has bloomed for the last 2 seasons. I have yet to get any berries. What am I doing wrong?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 21, 2012 at 11:45 am

      If the plant is blooming and there is little or no fruit, then it is probably a leaf-producing variety rather than a fruit-producing variety. There were pioneers from England who brought a variety they called English Tea Berry, and they used the leaves for tea. It blooms every year, but has no fruit. GHS

  • Reply
    karen
    March 25, 2012 at 4:55 am

    Will goji berry bushes grow in a tropical climate? The weather doesn’t get cold enough for a dormant period.
    The temperatures remain between 70 degrees to 90 year around.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 2, 2012 at 12:38 pm

      They will not do very well in your area. With that being said, there are folks in warmer climates who keep them pruned (which forces the new wood that the berries grow on) and get berries most of the year. Just not sure how many years they will keep producing.

  • Reply
    David
    May 13, 2012 at 6:20 pm

    I planted a Goji berry bush last year and had a few berries. However, I didn’t realise how fast or how big it can grow and now want to move it against a fence where it can spread out more. How and when is it best to do this? I think I will simply have to settle for some drastic pruning this year. Also, at the moment it is supported on a cane – will it become self-supporting? I live in North London, U.K.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 14, 2012 at 9:48 am

      Yes they are self-supporting; however a wire cage would make it easier to work with. If the plant needs moved, I would do it in the fall.

  • Reply
    Eric
    May 21, 2012 at 1:50 pm

    Recently bought a Goji berry plant here in southern California. Planted in a large pot with regular potting mix and kept the soil moist. Lots of new growth and noticed a few flowers. Yesterday noticed 2 tiny fruit! Wasn’t expecting any for at least another year or two.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 30, 2012 at 8:09 am

      Sometimes the Goji plants will produce a few berries the first year. Enjoy!

  • Reply
    gloria
    May 23, 2012 at 1:55 pm

    I started my goji from seed 2011 fall and it survived all summer in a pot in the shade. Early this spring it was about 4 inches high, so I planted it in the ground and it grew to 14 inches tall, leaves looked fine. Now it is 90 degrees in Central Florida, the leaves turned yellow and have fallen off the plant. What do I need to do? Should I dig it up and put it in a pot with miracle grow garden soil?

    The medium I used in the ground was sand, manure and garden soil.
    I don’t want to lose it. About a month ago, I did put 6 6 6 around the base, not sure if that was the right thing.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 30, 2012 at 8:13 am

      How much water it has been receiving is important. If you have been relying on rainfall, it probably is not getting enough. Goji plants do not like a lot of fertilizer, the amount of manure you used could be a problem. Was it aged manure or fresh, how much did you use?

  • Reply
    Leslie
    June 5, 2012 at 3:49 am

    I bought a Goji (24″ tall) in a gallon pot. I live in the high desert of central Oregon where the growing season is short but quite hot & dry, and the freezes are very unpredictable. Will the leaves drop from the Goji if it freezes in June or the beginning of Sept? Could it winter outside, in an unheated greenhouse, or should I bring it in to winter it? I want to plant it in a long-term home soon.

  • Reply
    Patrick
    July 22, 2012 at 9:04 pm

    Will Goji grow in the high desert area of Central Oregon?
    Irrigation is available. Thank you

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 27, 2012 at 11:37 am

      Yes Goji plants will grow in your area, water and some fertilizer would be needed.

  • Reply
    Mark
    August 18, 2012 at 11:10 am

    How do I grow the berries? Do I just take one of my current berries and stick it in the ground? Or do I have to buy seeds? Aren’t the berries the seeds?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 20, 2012 at 4:49 pm

      Goji berries can be started from seed; however it is very difficult and most that try give up. It is much easier to start with a cutting from a bush that is already growing.

  • Reply
    Mary
    September 3, 2012 at 3:14 pm

    I purchased a healthy Goji and planted it in a very deep pot. It grew well, but even better when it was taken outside. Now something is eating its leaves, and it will soon be stripped of its leaves. It is not slugs, but something is finding these leaves very tasty. How can I save the plant?
    Thank you for this informative site.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 7, 2012 at 2:06 pm

      Goji plants are very hardy, your plant will likely come back. However you should determine what is eating the leaves or this will continue and your plant will die.

  • Reply
    jana broucinek
    September 3, 2012 at 4:20 pm

    I live in Central Florida. I purchased my Goji Berry this past Spring as four inch potted plants. When I got them home, I transplanted them to a larger pot, and they bloomed well and seemed to thrive. The berries, however, bloomed very small, and turned brown before they grew to full size. I thought perhaps they were getting too much sun, so I moved the pot to partial shade. After abundant rain, I presumed that the small, unhealthy berries were the result of too much water. Now the conditions are perfect, but the berries still fail to develop well and are still brown. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 7, 2012 at 2:04 pm

      Too much rain only becomes a problem if there is not enough drainage, which you have plenty of since the Goji berries are growing inside a container with drain holes. The pH level however could be a problem. If you have not tested, that needs done first. It should be 6.8 or higher. Full sun is what they love. Let us know if you have any further questions.

  • Reply
    Nicole Forbes
    September 18, 2012 at 10:40 am

    Seriously? You recommend Jobe’s fertilizer over an organic brand?!? All this promotion of a super food like Goji berries and then suggesting it be nourished with a chemical fertilizer is contradicictory. If fertilizer is necessary I suggest using organic and if possible pro-biotic nutrients on your edible crops.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 20, 2012 at 8:57 am

      Nicole, Job’s also has organic spikes; which we offer. Thanks for the feedback!

  • Reply
    Pezo
    October 6, 2012 at 11:08 am

    Hi all you can easily make your own cheap natural fertilizer for all plants and veges. Get some bone meal, put 4 hand fulls in a 5 liter old mineral water bottle and cover with water. Leave it outside for 2 weeks with the lid slightly open so it can breathe a little. After 2 weeks you will have natural organic concentrated liquid fertilizer. Dilute a cap full in about 5 liters of water but shake original fertilizer bottle before use. Feed plants with this water mix every 3rd day and plants will grow like wildfire.

  • Reply
    Carmen
    October 11, 2012 at 8:11 pm

    I started goji plants from seed over a year ago. I soaked berries to blend and drink, at the bottom, of glass were all the seeds. I sprouted them in a wet paper towel. I had 8 plants, but I’m done to 5. All are in pots and have yet to bear fruit. They are hardy. I give them partial sun/shade and I live in Los Angeles area. I will follow the bone meal advice, and add more mulch. I do not want them to die, thus the research. Great info from all – thank you

  • Reply
    Cindy
    November 11, 2012 at 7:05 pm

    I just received 2 bare root goji berry plants. On each there is a think stem on one end and then small stems on the other. One of the plants has buds on the side with slender stems. The other end is sort of thick and has a bark like covering. Both plants have small wire like shoots. One has them on the thick stem end, the other has them on the multiple slender stemmed end.
    WHICH end should be planted? Honestly, I have planted a lot of bare root plants and these have me stymied.
    Thanks
    Cindy

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      November 13, 2012 at 9:54 am

      Cindy, the end with small wire like shoots is the end you put into the soil, about 1-inch deep. Keep the soil moist. Within 2-4 weeks you will have new growth shooting out both plants.

  • Reply
    Dennis Bean-Larson
    January 4, 2013 at 1:49 am

    Hi there. We’re wondering if goji will grow here in Northern Lower Michigan? Traverse City area. Our soil is well drained and sandy about 7.5 ph. Autumn Olive plants do very well right here. We have about 2000′ of them along our road frontage that I planted 30 years ago, the berries are plentiful but not really marketable.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 4, 2013 at 3:07 pm

      Yes Goji Berries will grow just fine in your area of Michigan.

  • Reply
    andrew
    January 7, 2013 at 11:43 pm

    I live in the desert (Las Vegas) can the plant grow here or would an attempt be a waste of time?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 19, 2013 at 3:21 pm

      Andrew, what is the hardiness zone where you live?

  • Reply
    Tony
    January 8, 2013 at 9:06 am

    I received 2 Goji plants last summer. I am in NH, planted them in the ground, and did not get any real growth… One produced 1 spindly stem about 2 ft tall with some leaves on it, but the other struggled to do anything. Is this normal or should I do something this spring to jump start them? Anything non-chemical (We are completely Organic) that they like? I have very good compost, vermicompost, rabbit poop, and I make biologically active compost teas to water my plant with. Thanks!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 19, 2013 at 3:20 pm

      Tony, Goji plants do not live overly rich soil, sounds like that could be the problem. Do not give them any more compost tea. Let me know who they are doing once summer has arrived.

  • Reply
    vimol
    January 10, 2013 at 1:50 am

    I live in western Australia with sandy soil. I have two Goji berry plants and this year is the third year. One plant against the fence and got afternoon sun and never bear a single fruit and the other plant is in the middle of the garden, got sun all day, produced little amount of fruit in the past 2 years. This year it start to have flower and drop off, no berry at all for this year. My garden has got lot of insect to pollinate the plants. Soil had been cover with mulch and water well. I have no idea what wrong with it at all.
    Kind regards,
    Vimol

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 19, 2013 at 3:18 pm

      The first thing you need to do is take a soil sample. Only then we you be able to determine why your Goji’s are not doing well.

  • Reply
    Jennifer
    January 12, 2013 at 6:10 pm

    Will Goji berries grow well in a container in San Antonio? We are zone 8b and have long, hot, dry summers and very mild winters.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 19, 2013 at 3:17 pm

      Jennifer, Goji plants will do well in your area, as long as you keep it watered during those hot, dry days.

  • Reply
    Nica Vasile
    January 15, 2013 at 7:08 am

    Hello,

    I’m living in Europe, Romania(30-35 degrees(Celsius) in the summer time and down to -20 degrees during winter(normaly in winter we have minus 5-8 degrees for 2 months). I have to say that I have a very good soil and the possibility for irigation. Can you tell me please if this plant will grow here?

    Kind regards,
    Vasile

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 13, 2013 at 8:44 am

      Vasile the Goji Berry plant would grow in your conditions. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    wendy
    January 17, 2013 at 12:43 pm

    how will these plants do in northern mn.? I am in zone 3 and one catolog says zone 3 and one says zone 6 and they appear to be the same plant .

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 19, 2013 at 2:16 pm

      Wendy, our Goji plants do well in zone 3.

  • Reply
    frank
    February 1, 2013 at 1:25 pm

    I live in az. What size pot should I use. I have a 6″plant Should i plant it outdoors instead?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      February 21, 2013 at 8:30 pm

      Frank, it would be fine to start the Goji in a pot then move it outside after a couple of months. We would recommend at least and 10″ pot to get started.

  • Reply
    Jack Moore
    February 5, 2013 at 5:45 pm

    What about growing in a container in the ground? I have a 450 sf community garden plot, so want to contain bush size. Would a 5 gallon container (with ample drainage holes) be effective in keeping bush size smaller? Should I also follow your pruning guidance?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      February 21, 2013 at 8:28 pm

      Jack, the drainage holes will allow the Goji roots to expand outside the container, so no it would not keep it small. Pruning will keep it small if that is what you desire.

  • Reply
    Zafra
    February 7, 2013 at 1:41 pm

    I have gojis growing from seed at least one of which is doing really well. I only found out after buying and planting the seeds that gojis have chill requirements(no thanks to the “tropical” seed store that didn’t bother to mention that it’s not a tropical plant). Anyway, I see above that sometimes people in warm climates manage to get fruit by pruning – if that were possible I’d love to try it. We are in a tropical climate but at an altitude that makes the night temps drop as low as the low 60s fairly regularly. Does anyone have any advice for how to best give it a go with my gojis – how to prune them, for instance, or if they have a chance of fruiting in this climate? Thanks for all the great information.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      February 21, 2013 at 8:32 pm

      Zafra, congratulations on starting a Goji from seed, that is very hard to do. Gogi bushes only grow fruit on “new wood”, so yes, pruning it back some each year will give you the fruits you desire, even in a warm climate.

  • Reply
    Jamie
    February 10, 2013 at 2:30 pm

    I live in zone 6. If I opt to grow my goji berries in large containers, do I have to bring them indoors over the winter months?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      February 21, 2013 at 8:25 pm

      Jamie, if you bring the Goji plants in for the winter, leave them in an unheated area only.

  • Reply
    betsy
    February 23, 2013 at 12:48 pm

    Is there a commercial market in the US for goji berries? We have a blueberry farm and are looking at expanding into additional crops. If so, can you advise as to who would be potential buyers?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      February 24, 2013 at 7:04 pm

      Betsy, the Goji Berry market is rapidly growing. Good luck on your farm!

  • Reply
    Becky
    March 10, 2013 at 8:20 pm

    I have sprouted a whole pot of goji plants from seed and just recently moved them to my yard. I kept them in a sunny window in well drained soil and kept them watered. They are about a foot tall from last fall, about Oct. They are prolific sprouters. I soaked them in water overnight, opened the berries, and spread them in the soil, covering them lightly. There were dozens of seeds per berry. Voila!

  • Reply
    Steve
    March 13, 2013 at 2:00 am

    Glad to see so many others interested in growing goji. I started plants from seed about 3 years ago now, and have about a dozen fruting plants. They definitely take patience – this year it seemed like they were dormant for three months. Once they take off they really grow. Main thing I’ve learned is don’t over-water. (Los Angeles)

  • Reply
    Manny G.
    March 23, 2013 at 3:45 pm

    Bought a 2 ft plant about 6 weeks ago, transplanted it into a 6 gallon pot using Humboldt Earth mix which includes bat guano. Last week noticed 1 flower on it should I be expecting more following fruit there after? Also are the new shoots growing from the root potential new plants, they keep popping up and I keep clipping them? Thanks. Chino, CA.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 30, 2013 at 3:36 pm

      Manny, you will not get much flowers or fruits the first year. The second year will bring more, and by the third, the Goji Berry plant will be fully producing berries. Yes keep the new shoots clipped off unless you want it to spread. Enjoy your plant.

  • Reply
    Pam
    March 24, 2013 at 2:22 pm

    I have small place but what is the best way the goji berry? I can grow in the ground but very limited space. Should I ground in a contained?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 30, 2013 at 3:33 pm

      Pam, if your space is small, I would recommend a container for your Goji Berry. You will just have to make sure your container is about the size of a 5 gallon bucket.

  • Reply
    Melissa
    April 24, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    My goji is3yrs old, and is huge already for this time of year. It’s flowering with berries starting. Can I divide it, like a normal plant?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 29, 2013 at 10:39 am

      Melissa, you can take cuttings off the one that growing well and root them. Enjoy your Goji berries!

  • Reply
    TD Clark
    April 26, 2013 at 3:46 am

    I moved over the winter to CT from NC and brought my potted goji berry plants with me. They have yet to do anything this year and I was wondering how I could determine if they died over the winter or if they are just dormant.

    Thanks for any suggestions

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 29, 2013 at 10:38 am

      TD Clark, it may not be warm enough for them to start growing yet. If you don’t see growth within the next 3 weeks, it is probably dead.

  • Reply
    Emma
    May 3, 2013 at 6:00 am

    A friend gave me a pot of Goji berry plant, which were the new shoots from their big Goji berry tree. A few weeks ago, it produced a few berries, which were all eaten by the birds.

    My question is this plant has hardly grown since I got it. In about 7 months, it’s grown only 2 or 3 inch taller. Is this normal? It’s sitting in a 3 gallon container that’s about 12 inch tall.

    I live in Silicone Valley of California.

    Also, another friend told me the leaves of goji berry are edible. Does that depend on the kinds of goji berry plant?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 3, 2013 at 9:51 am

      Emma, it would be normal to only grow a few inches in that time frame since you are starting with a cutting. Birds do love Goji Berries, you need to cover them up once the berries start coming on. We don’t have info on eating the leaves. Good luck with your plant.

  • Reply
    Selma Chung
    May 11, 2013 at 2:25 am

    Is is the nature of the gogi plant to be invasive? I have shoots appearing within five feet of the mother plant,

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 13, 2013 at 9:29 am

      Selma, the Goji plant does spread. If you don’t want this to happen, simply keep the shoots trimmed back.

  • Reply
    Emma
    May 20, 2013 at 4:59 am

    Thank you for your answer.

    My goji berry grown from last-year’s cutting grows some fruits, but they taste bitter. Any idea?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 20, 2013 at 3:31 pm

      Emma, how much moisture is it getting through out the summer?

  • Reply
    Emma
    May 20, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    I don’t know how to give you a number for moisture. But I almost water them daily during summer.

  • Reply
    jstutzman
    May 25, 2013 at 10:14 am

    Emma, you should have your soil tested to determine the pH levels. We have inexpensive testers if you don’t already have one. http://www.gardenharvestsupply.com/ProductCart/pc/Home-Soil-Testing-Kits-and-Light-Meters-c512.htm

  • Reply
    Windy Acres
    June 14, 2013 at 4:39 pm

    Thnks for a clear and understandable explanation. And for the heads up about assertive nature of spreading. It will be helpful, as I’m trying Goji’s for the first time. LOL no one warned me about the nature of the trumpet vine I planted ! Oh what a surprise !!! If I get to share the berries with the birds, it’s another bonus.
    ;~D

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 17, 2013 at 8:38 am

      Windy Acres, if you don’t cover up the Goji’s when the berries come on, the birds might not share with you. Good luck.

  • Reply
    Emma
    July 18, 2013 at 10:30 pm

    After I re-pot my goji berry with steer manure, it grows much better and the berries are much more sweeter. My steer manure is alkaline.

    There are white powdery patches on many leaves. Are they fungus? My goji berry plant is situation right next to the swimming pool. It gets a lot of sun and also humidity there. Should I move it away from swimming pool?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 19, 2013 at 3:41 pm

      Emma, yes you should move it away from your swimming pool. Is the manure composted before you use it?

      Joe

  • Reply
    Emma
    July 21, 2013 at 2:21 am

    The steer manure was bought from Osh. It’s composted.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 22, 2013 at 8:59 am

      Emma, if I were you, I would stop using the compost. Goji plants do not like too much nutrients. Let me know how they do after the move.

  • Reply
    Emma
    August 2, 2013 at 1:30 am

    I’ve not added any more compost.

    I moved my goji berry to a place away from the swimming pool but unfortunately and unknowingly to a spot where the sprinkler can reach. (I also realize its old spot that’s by the swimming pool also can be reached by sprinkler, although not as much) After a couple of days, all its leaves were covered with white powdery stuff.

    Even though I quickly moved it to a dry spot, the damage remains: yellow leaves, white powdery leaves, and bitter fruits (although bigger than ever). As I wrote, my goji berry grew really well after re-potting and now there are lots of unripe fruits. I’ve pulled out quiet a few leaves, but to get rid of this white powdery stuff, I would have to pull out all leaves.

    What do you recommend? This fungus problem is not showing any sign of abating.

  • Reply
    Emma
    August 3, 2013 at 3:16 am

    Can I ask why diatomaceous earth? I did a little online research. It’s a insecticide and pesticide, but I don’t see it as a fungicide.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 6, 2013 at 1:35 pm

      Emma, DE has been researched for use on cotton and a variety of veggies for this application.

  • Reply
    elisa
    August 16, 2013 at 5:19 pm

    My Goji berries is not growing any fruit but tons of leaves and shoots. Some leaves on shoots are smaller than others and it’s in a shady area about 2-3 hours of sun. I had it about 1 year now and it’s getting very tall. I haven’t try to prune the shoots yet. Would that help? How to get fruit?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 19, 2013 at 8:42 am

      Elisa, berries grow on “new” wood only. If you don’t prune, you will get very few berries. The second and largest issue is that Goji plants need full sun, at least 8 hours. You will need to move it’s location for the berries to start growing. Good luck.

  • Reply
    Mary
    August 19, 2013 at 2:44 pm

    I started growing a Gojiberry plant in a large container. The leaves are covered with white powdery stuff that could not be removed. Is this fungus? Kindly advise how to get rid of it, and how to avoid the white powdery stuff. Can it be salvaged? Mary

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 19, 2013 at 2:47 pm

      Mary, Sounds like powdery mildew. Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth is reported to control powdery mildew. There are also various copper fungicides for mildew. The spores for this bug are everywhere and all solanaceae family plants seem to be susceptible. I would not use infected leaves for tea. Unlike tomatoes, I don’t think powdery mildew will kill gojiberries, but it should be controlled. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Mary
    September 13, 2013 at 10:28 am

    I have learned from the previous comments but I have another problem that maybe someone can help with. The yellowjackets are trying to suck the juice out of every berry before tehy are even ripe enough to pick. I’ve been hosing the plants down about every other day hoping to wash off the juicy smell that is atracting them and that helps some but not enough. Any ideas on how to reclaim my berries ?? (They TOTALLY took over my black currants and I got NO berries…Very bad year for yellowjackets here)

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      October 14, 2013 at 7:16 am

      Mary, we would recommend setting out yellow jacket traps. Take an old plastic soda bottle, put apple juice in the bottom, then sit it in a sunny location. Good luck!

  • Reply
    John burke
    September 25, 2013 at 10:52 am

    I have 2 acres in 2000 foot elevation south facing slope western slope of sierras east of sacramento. How far apart should I plant the berries for max production and how long do the plants live?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      October 10, 2013 at 4:06 pm

      John, the best spacing for your Goji Berry plant is 4 feet between plants and 8 feet between rows. The plants are perennials, so they come back each year. Once the nights stay below 45F, they will go dormant. Good luck!

  • Reply
    Linda
    October 10, 2013 at 2:52 am

    I have some shoots popping up here and there and would like to transplant them…I live in Seattle. When is the best time of year to dig up the shoots and replant?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      October 10, 2013 at 4:00 pm

      Linda it would depend on how many days till your first fall frost date it. I would not do it unless you have at least 6 weeks left before frost. If you don’t have that much time now, do it in the spring after the leaves start sprouting on the Goji plant.

  • Reply
    Desiree
    November 6, 2013 at 7:40 pm

    You can eat the Goji berry leaves, they are good for your eyesight. In China, we buy branches of Goji berry leaves from the wet market, and take off the leaves, then make soup or broth out of them. We normally add eggs (beat them first) to the broth. Add some salty and chicken stock to flavour the broth.

  • Reply
    Ferguson
    November 13, 2013 at 11:09 pm

    Hi,
    I am new at gardening & was interested in growing these Goji berries.
    I live in east Tennessee. Is this an ideal location to grow them?
    When would be the best time to get started? Should I start them out as seeds or purchase a small plant?
    I’ve also read that they should not be transferred from indoors to outdoors, but rather remain wherever they first started out.
    I apologize for all the questions, but I have no idea what I’m doing here.

    All advice appreciated

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      November 19, 2013 at 9:13 am

      Hello Ferguson. Good questions. It is best to plant Goji Berries in locations that enjoy full sun. It is certainly easier to start with plants verses seeds. They are a very hardy plant and will not be bothered by going from inside to the outside. Good luck with your plants!

  • Reply
    Kenny Demick
    November 18, 2013 at 12:35 am

    I own a Naturally Grown Goji farm in Nevada. I brought fresh goji to the market this summer. We sell fresh leaves for eating in salads and other cooking. We have tea and goji powder from tea leaves. Right now I have 500 sets…or bushes..since they produce heavier as sets. I have taken 8 years to master the goji growing. I have 5000 cuttings and babies growing and will have 2000 producing plants next summer. With in 5 years I plan to have 20 acres in full production.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      November 19, 2013 at 9:10 am

      Kenny that sounds great, keep up the good work!

  • Reply
    Christopher
    December 9, 2013 at 7:53 pm

    Hi, I live in southern Ohio. I have a 7 month old goji plant, It is 7 feet tall and has 5 stems or shots whatever you want to call them. In the summer it was very moist here and my plants had gotten some sort of fungus on them and all of the leafs fell of. So I got some anti fungal spray and treeted the plant. Some of the leafs grew back but only on the south side of the plant. Will the rest of the plant ever grow its leafs back? Is it normal for the plant to still be growing and still have leafs on it this time of year? I know it is pretty cold resistant but its been down in the 2o’s and my plant still hasnt lost its leafs.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      December 9, 2013 at 8:08 pm

      Hello Christopher. Yes Goji plants can be very hardy, with winter setting in you should lose the remaining leaves very soon. Sorry to hear about the fungal issue. It should put out new growth next year and grow just fine, as long as the fungal issue is not persistent in your area. At the first sign of it next year, apply some food grade diatomaceous earth. About the height, we would recommend pruning it down to a height you can manage from the ground. Remember, Goji Berries grow on new wood only, so lots of trimming. Good luck with your plant.

  • Reply
    Mary
    February 9, 2014 at 9:38 pm

    Has anyone tried growing gogi berriess in Maine? I am on the edge of zones 4-5.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      February 9, 2014 at 9:44 pm

      Mary, our Goji Berry plants are good down to zone 3, so you would have no issues growing them in your area.

  • Reply
    Janice
    March 9, 2014 at 9:21 am

    What pH is recommended for growing goji berry plants ?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 10, 2014 at 9:33 am

      Janice, the pH level of the soil that goji plants thrive in is 6.8

  • Reply
    Judith
    April 20, 2014 at 3:05 pm

    I am debating whether to put my new goji plants in the ground or a bucket. I lost 4 that I put in the ground last year and I don’t want to lose these too! If you put them in a bucket, I’m assuming that you need to bring them indoors to a cool spot for the winter (zone 4-5), but want to verify. Will they stay dormant in a basement or garage all winter and then come back in the Spring?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 21, 2014 at 1:26 pm

      Judith, do you think you lost them over the winter? It takes consistent days above 45F for them to come out of dormancy.

  • Reply
    Judith
    April 23, 2014 at 11:24 am

    I lost them over the summer. They were overtaken by weeds and got choked out. My bad!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 24, 2014 at 7:19 pm

      Judith, starting the new ones in a bucket is a great way to start them. In fact you can leave them in there a couple of years before putting them into the ground. During the winter, it is helpful for your Goji’s if you bring them inside an unheated building. Let me know if you have further questions. Joe

  • Reply
    Judith
    May 4, 2014 at 10:49 pm

    Unfortunately, they were overtaken by weeds. They overwintered just fine the year before but didn’t make it through the entire summer. I have two new goji’s and don’t want to kill them. One is from WFF and the other from Garden’s Alive. The interesting thing is that they don’t look at all like each other.

  • Reply
    greg
    May 11, 2014 at 3:37 am

    Can you use routone powder to take cutting. And how do yo do it for best results.
    Thanks Greg

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 12, 2014 at 10:21 am

      Greg we are not familiar with that product. Cuttings must be stems old enough to have changed from green to gray in color. Success on cuttings is considered very good at 40%, we do not recommend this method for starting Goji plants. Rooted starts are the preferred method.

  • Reply
    Greg Garriss
    May 19, 2014 at 4:00 pm

    Cuttings can be fussy and success can be low.. That said, I saw a Youtube where a guy just shoved branches in the ground and they rooted fine. Annoying…

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 23, 2014 at 9:36 am

      Greg, I think we need that fellow to do all of our plantings. Just doesn’t happen that easily. Thanks for the comments. Joe

  • Reply
    joanna
    May 21, 2014 at 4:59 am

    planted 5 years ago grow 6 feet, but never any fruit yet!
    I prune every autumn. problem may be, they keep getting a silvery coverage on leaves and slightly wither, i guess its disease? they are now 20 inches high. Looks like same problem again.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 2, 2014 at 9:48 am

      Joanna: This sounds like powdery mildew, which usually is tied to hot weather, not cold wet. In fact hosing off the leaves may help. The spores for this fungus are found everywhere. There are a lot of fungicides to use for powdery mildew, but Diatomaceous Earth (DE) is very effective and not a human health hazard. DE is applied dry to cover the plants and on the soil around the plants. Also too much nitrogen retards fruiting and a low soil pH may contribute to powdery mildew. Good luck with your Goji Berry plant.

  • Reply
    Chris
    June 22, 2014 at 11:05 pm

    I have a healthy plant ready to go into the ground. However, we have thousands of gophers, and every single plant on the property has been put into a gopher basket or it won’t survive. Even full grown fig trees have been taken down. My question: since the Goji has such a long tap root system, how can I protect the roots but allow them to go down as far as they can? I am thinking of making a long tube of gopher basket material, maybe 30 inches long, and hope the gophers don’t go further down than that to eat. Thoughts?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 23, 2014 at 8:34 am

      Good question Chris, and one I am not sure can be satisfied. I think your suggestion would be helpful; however the Goji plant needs more than just its tap root to thrive. So I am not sure that measure alone will be enough. If you give it a try, please let us know how it turns out.
      Joe
      GHS

  • Reply
    Tanya
    June 30, 2014 at 1:05 pm

    Last year my aunt gave me a little branch from her goji plant (about 5 inches). I stuck the little twig into the veggie raised bed and now it’s fruiting like crazy! I’m getting thousands of berries. In just one year it grew into quite a big bush. Maybe it’s just luck. I don’t know… But I love eating them fresh right off the vines.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 30, 2014 at 3:47 pm

      Tanya, that sounds great! We would love to see a photo. GHS

  • Reply
    SCOTTY
    July 3, 2014 at 9:37 pm

    Third or fourth trip back to your site for the Goji growing hints. I would put your tips and information in the top five for growing the Goji. I have 9 plants growing now and- no two -are growing the same, they all seem to have unique qualities. Thanks again for the tips. I’m sure I’ll be back (I can’t remember everything) so please keep your site going! Scotty. I also shared this to my FB site for some other new Goji growers. Thanks again.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 4, 2014 at 9:16 am

      Glad to hear your plants are doing well Scotty! Happy gardening. GHS

  • Reply
    jessica
    July 5, 2014 at 3:34 am

    Hi, I live in Utah and was given several goji bushes last week. They withered as soon as she took them out of the ground. I put them in cool muddy very wet mud until that night and then planted. This week, the leaves are super tiny any shriveled. I have no clue if it will bounce back. I took all leaves off as they were dead. Any suggestions?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 5, 2014 at 9:22 am

      Jessica, goji is fairly hardy. I would keep them in “moist” soil for the next 2-3 weeks. They should push some new leaves soon. Good luck! GHS

  • Reply
    pat
    July 7, 2014 at 10:25 pm

    Probably going to be the same answer to my question as the rest of these folks, but I guess I just need some reassuring. I’ve had my plant for 2 years now, we live in southern California and it really grew fast with our weather. It’s about 8 feet tall if you stand them up and really stringy with lightly withered leaves that start about 18 inches up from the pot it’s planted in and doesn’t have many leaves at all. It seriously looks like the Charlie Brown tree of goji. Anyways, what to do? Trim, cut way back and try again, or wait another year? I do still need to test the soil tho. Please help me. Thanks, Pat

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 8, 2014 at 7:43 am

      Hello Pat. We would agree, testing your soil is the first step you should take. What size is the container the Goji Berry plant is in, how often do you water it, and do you add any fertilizer (and if so, how often)? GHS

  • Reply
    pat
    July 8, 2014 at 10:18 am

    I water it every day otherwise it looks to dry, fertilizer has been a while and it’s in a 2 foot by 2 foot container.

  • Reply
    Raik Liind
    August 4, 2014 at 7:39 am

    My plants (6) are outside and are 2 to 3 years old. Looking very healthy (maybe too healthy?) I have read to prune them and I have read absolutely do NOT prune. I now have a situation where a lot branches are like tassels and many are on the ground. I guess the obvious thing to do is prune them???? But when? Now, in the middle of summer or do I wait till the end of winter????
    Thanks
    Raik

    Location: Estonia, EU.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 4, 2014 at 7:49 am

      Raik: Keep in mind that Goji Berry plants only produce berries on “new wood”, which only happens when when the plant is pruned. The best time to prune them is early in the year before they start pushing berries.

  • Reply
    Jason
    August 20, 2014 at 11:29 pm

    Wow. I didn’t realize I had a freaky weird goji berry plant. I put it in the ground this past spring, and it hasn’t grown to be more than maybe 30″ tall, but I’m getting plenty of berries off of it (well, for such a small plant, anyway). I had no clue it was able to get so large. Maybe it’ll grow more next year and I’ll get TONs of berries.

  • Reply
    mferwerda
    September 2, 2014 at 9:43 am

    Are Goji Berries invasive? I live in MI, zone 5, and am overwhelmed with extremely invasive blackberries, raspberries, elderberries, etc. Trying to decide a “safe” place for Gojis. Also, sites differ; are two plants necessary? Thank you for your help!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 2, 2014 at 10:13 am

      Hello mferwerda: Goji Berries do spread. However the runners can be removed to keep it growing in one area. Two plants are not necessary. Good luck! GHS

  • Reply
    Kate
    September 3, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    I’m thinking about ordering a couple of two-year starts. It seems like this should be a good time of year to get them established – or do I need to wait for spring? I live in rural Sonoma County. Any thoughts? Originally I had hoped to buy older, mature plants, but the darned things are hard to come by!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 3, 2014 at 3:32 pm

      Hello Kate: Now is a fine time to plant Goji Berry plants. Instructions are included. Good luck!

  • Reply
    Karen Murphy
    September 17, 2014 at 4:05 pm

    Hi,
    I live in Zone 9B in Gulf Coast central Florida. This May I bought two
    Gogi plants and potted them in big pots, good soil mix including rock dust and bio char. At first they sat and lost some leaves, so I trimmed the long twigs. Over the hot summer they grew more green branches and are producing lots of pretty light purple flowers, but they don’t seem to be setting fruit. I tried hand pollinating them on a few flowers, and they seem to have lots of pollen. Summer and early fall are really hot down here, and I don’t really know how this climate works for a Himalayan plant. I have not checked the ph yet. I really hope this works for me! Any comments. By the way, before I pruned the branches got long and gangly. I want a bushy, full plant so as to get more fruit, so I think the pruning is working. Also, twigs that don’t have foliage are still green when scratched, so don’t give up on them.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 19, 2014 at 8:12 am

      Karen, It sounds like you are doing everything correctly. You do not need to hand pollinate as Goji plants are self pollinating. Fruit follows the flowers so get ready. Good luck with our plant!

  • Reply
    llee
    November 19, 2014 at 3:53 pm

    I live in Seattle, WA area. What is the best season to plant Goji plant?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      December 30, 2014 at 11:18 am

      Hello Llee. Goji Berries can be planted anytime the ground is not frozen. If doing so in the fall, allow 6 weeks before your first frost for planting. They can also be started inside in containers any time of the year.

  • Reply
    Dave Morin
    December 7, 2014 at 10:00 pm

    Like the last entry Iam in zone 9B in central Fla I have four bushy large plants that produced hundreds of flowers this summer but not one berry. Could it be too hot, I have them under shade cloth in my nursery.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      December 30, 2014 at 11:10 am

      Dave, how hard did you prune them after they last produced their berries? Joe

  • Reply
    Pam tipping
    March 9, 2015 at 4:10 pm

    Hi
    I live in central Portugal and planted a goji berry close to our de king. I want to move it as we have extended the decking and the steps need to go where the plant is. Can I transplant it without damaging it!
    Thanks for your help

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 13, 2015 at 11:29 am

      Hello Pam. Yes you can move the goji plant. Try and digg at least 12 inches away from the plant and about 12 inches deep. Once you get it into the new spot, keep it watered for at least 3 weeks. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Suzie
    March 13, 2015 at 8:28 pm

    We purchased small plants from a local nursery in 6″ pots. Transferred them to larger pots and let them grow a year. Quite by accident, a long branch fell over into a bucket of dirt that was near by and appears to have rooted. Will clip it off of the parent plant and see what happens. Thinking about trying this with a blueberry bush.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 14, 2015 at 9:04 am

      Your finding is correct Suzie, they will root if put into the dirt. Enjoy your new Goji plant and good luck with trying this with your blueberry bush! GHS

  • Reply
    Sarah
    March 30, 2015 at 6:40 am

    Last spring I purchased 2 separate varieties of goji berries from a very reputable online nursery that I have purchased all my other berries and trees from. I thought it was strange that they had both peach and lavender blossoms. My berries are not sweet, in fact they taste like hot peppers. What am I doing wrong?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 2, 2015 at 9:53 am

      Sarah, it sure sounds like something got switched on you. Doesn’t sound anything like Goji Berries. GHS

  • Reply
    Tammy
    April 13, 2015 at 8:55 pm

    Do they shoot of miny plants like raspberrys or do u have to grow new ones by cutting or seed, near the end of lifespan, to maintain the suppy?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 13, 2015 at 9:20 pm

      Tammy, Goji Berries so produce shoots. Cuttings can also be rooted. Good luck with your plants. GHS

  • Reply
    Karen Murphy
    April 22, 2015 at 4:32 pm

    Well, I see. That my comment from last year about my gogi berry plants having flowers but no fruit is happening again this year. Lots of flowering, looks like they are supposed to but no fruit. Zone 9B or maybe 10 in gulf coast Florida. I’m frustrated. They are in large containers. Suggestions?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 23, 2015 at 10:29 am

      Karen, about the only way it would be flowering but not setting fruits would be from insects. Although not setting fruits has not been an issue with Goji Berries. Any change you could get us some photos of the different stages, pre-bloom, blooming, and immediately after blooming?

  • Reply
    AnnaB
    May 5, 2015 at 1:38 pm

    I live in zone 6B and planted a small goji bush last fall in a big container. All my plants are back now. Only the goji is still dormant (at least I hope so). Is this normal? I checked a little branch and it looks not dead. Is there any hope that my plant will make it?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 5, 2015 at 3:36 pm

      AnnaB. Goji plant can take a bit longer to come out of dormancy. If you dont see growth within the next couple of weeks, give us a shout and we will go from there. GHS

  • Reply
    Sheila
    May 9, 2015 at 4:17 pm

    We planted a Goji berry (purchased from a local nursery) in our yard about a month ago. The plant is about 2 feet tall and with very thin, droopy branches. It was looking very healthy until a few days ago. Now it’s leaves are yellowing. We have been watering every day as it’s been dry here in Southeastern Ohio. Could it be getting too much water?

  • Reply
    Michelle
    May 18, 2015 at 6:46 am

    I am trying to plan a permaculture garden and am very interested in including goji berries as part of the design. I was wondering if you knew of any plants that partner well with the goji berry to help with it’s success?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 18, 2015 at 8:36 am

      Michelle, Goji plants do not really need any other companion plants to help them grow successfully. They grow like a shrub so space is very important. Good luck with your garden! GHS

  • Reply
    Sheila
    May 23, 2015 at 12:15 am

    Hi we have two Goji’s and have yet to get more than two berries from them. Right now leaves on one are yellow and both are showing powdery mildew. What to do?
    We planted them two years Ago as small bushes

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 27, 2015 at 3:38 pm

      Sheila, sorry we missed your earlier comment. Are they in full sun? Also they do not like too much water. How much water do you give them when you do the watering? Joe with GHS

  • Reply
    greg
    May 27, 2015 at 5:27 pm

    I live in Kennesaw ga, I planted one in a pot 1 month ago it came in sleave about 8″ tall with 2 shoots. Now its 30″ tall. Should I let it grow and put a tomato basket around it or let it droop? Should I prune to 1 foot to promote more growth?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 28, 2015 at 2:40 pm

      Hello Greg. You do not need to prune it until it reaches the size you want it to be. It will get stronger as it grows. If you dont like it to droop, go ahead and use a cage to prop it up. Good luck with your Goji plant!

  • Reply
    jan
    May 28, 2015 at 3:47 pm

    are goji bushes self pollinating or do i need to bet more than one?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 2, 2015 at 9:25 am

      Jan, you only need one plant. Good luck with growing your Goji plant. GHS

  • Reply
    Karen McGlynn
    June 1, 2015 at 4:38 pm

    I have a goji berry plant that is already bearing fruit. I have it in a pot outside and I am concerned about what I should do with it in the winter. I usually bring my potted plant inside during the winter. should I do this with the goji berry?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 2, 2015 at 9:24 am

      Karen, congrats on your fruit bearing Goji! Yes, your pot should be placed into an unheated indoors area for the winter. Do not place in anywhere there is heat as it needs a dormant period each year. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Doug S
    June 7, 2015 at 5:03 pm

    Hi,I’ve had my plants for three years now, I keep them in pots. They came back fine last summer, however this year they have yet to produce a single new leaf. The plant seems very much alive, it’s quite flexible and when cut the inside of the branch is still green. This time last year they had already grown a few inches. Any idea what’s happening and how to fix this?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 8, 2015 at 10:26 am

      Hello Doug: If a Goji does not get enough water in the fall, and with this being a potted plant, that is the most likely cause of the problem. Goji plants will also become shocked if they have too much fertilizer added. You can try keeping it watered for a few more weeks to see if it pushes any new growth. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Brigette
    June 15, 2015 at 8:30 pm

    I live in Clermont GA. My Gogi berry has grown well. However, no flowers. The bugs seem to be eating holes in the leaves. What do you recommend to put on them. Prefer something natural if possible. Thank you

  • Reply
    Trish
    June 25, 2015 at 9:08 am

    My potted goji is loosing leaves. It was growing well for a while but stopped. It has been rainy here and I have fertilize and tried to correct the ph. I don’t know what to do, water- not water, more fertilizer…help!

  • Reply
    Christina
    June 28, 2015 at 10:02 pm

    My goji berries are blooming like crazy but the fruit is not setting and fall off before it forms any suggestions to my problem?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 1, 2015 at 3:37 pm

      Christina: Can you tell us how its planted, how you water and how you fertilize? GHS

  • Reply
    Stephanie
    June 30, 2015 at 5:46 pm

    I purchased a Gogi Berry tree, at a Grocery store(2 weeks ago), it looked sad. It was marked $2.00….so I thought I would try to give it new life. It is still in the 1 gallon container. It looks much happier, and I’m seeing new leaves. The plant is about 2ft. tall, and was very (dead looking). I am wondering if I should keep it in the container, and bring it in for the winter (I live in South Eastern Michigan (winters very cold & lots of snow). I would put it in the basement, should I put it in the sun or in darker area (unfinished basement, no direct heat). OR would it be better if I plant it in the ground? I am NO gardener, but I don’t like to see plants thrown in trash because no one bought it.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 1, 2015 at 3:36 pm

      Stephanie: Congrats on the purchase! Leave it in the container till about the middle of August. Then go ahead and transplant it into the ground at a spot you want it to be its permanent home. Good luck with your Goji plant. GHS

  • Reply
    Lori
    July 1, 2015 at 2:44 pm

    I bought two goji plants that arrived in May. They are about 6 inches tall and I planted them directly in the ground right after they arrived. We had lots of rain the first few weeks after they were planted and I have kept them moist since then. They have done nothing, they look exactly as they did when I planted them. No new growth. I don’t think they are dead as the leaves on them still have a shade of green to them. I gave them some fertilizer last week, (before I read your article) in hopes to give them a boost of some sort. Still nothing. Ideas?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 1, 2015 at 3:33 pm

      Lori: It sounds like you need some replacement plants. If you ordered them from us, give us a call and we will get some new ones sent out. Joe

  • Reply
    Kim
    July 14, 2015 at 8:02 pm

    What are the best places to buy the plants?

  • Reply
    Rick
    July 25, 2015 at 7:06 pm

    I bought a 2yr goji stock root, I’ve had it for close to a month now and it still has not sprouted, I’m trying to grow it in a 5 gal container, im using happy frog potting mix with no fertilizer.
    Should I add fertilizer? And when can I expect my goji to wake up?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 13, 2015 at 3:05 pm

      Rick, it sounds like it is dead. If you purchased it from us, give us a call and we will resend you another. GHS

  • Reply
    Blaine
    August 15, 2015 at 5:13 pm

    I ordered a Goji berry plant from PCH, of all places. I live in NE Ohio. It seems to be growing nicely. It’s mid-August, and it’s blooming flowers. do you know if it will actually produce berries? the plant is in ground at it’s first year.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 17, 2015 at 8:02 am

      Blaine, congrats on your nicely growing Goji! Rather you are able to harvest fruits at this point in the year will be determined by the arrival of frost. If it is a late frost, you still have a good chance to harvest some berries. Good luck.

  • Reply
    Cindy Thompson
    August 20, 2015 at 9:30 pm

    My plant is doing great, but the berries taste bitter. Am I picking at the wrong time? Do I need a supplemental fertilizer? Thanks.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 21, 2015 at 12:22 pm

      Cindy, bitter tasting berries would be normal. Sounds like you are doing everything okay. GHS

  • Reply
    Sylvia
    August 25, 2015 at 2:22 am

    My plant is doing great – lots of leaves and branches, but no blossoms and therefore no fruit. It has been in my garden for two summers now and was probably 2 years old when I bought it. What am I doing wrong?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 25, 2015 at 10:40 am

      Sylvia: How much sun does it receive? What nutrients have you been feeding it and how often? Have you done a soil test laterly? GHS

  • Reply
    Linda
    September 8, 2015 at 3:53 pm

    I also ordered my goji berry bush from pch. When they arrived I thought they were dead sticks and I almost sent them back, but my daughter urged me to plant them and see what happened. Now I have a very nice plant about 18-20 inches tall. I planted it in a pot because I live in an apartment in Colorado and feared the winter would kill it.
    Its early September and ivam wondering what to do now. Should I move it inside when the evenings/ early mornings get cold? Do I prune it now ? I have read so much about Gojis that my head hurts. I just need simple instructions. Not too technical. I’ve never grown any plant that produces anything edible. Lol I am quite fond of it and would love to see it produce. Thanks

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 9, 2015 at 8:51 am

      Linda, congrats on your growing Goji plant! First off, they need to go dormant, so they should not be brought inside. However since it is in a container, the coldness will be harder on it compared to one growing in the ground. Once it losses its leaves and goes dormant, wrapping something loosely around it will help on the harshness. Uncover it in the spring once the night time temps stay above 30F. As far as pruning, follow our advice as listed in this article and you should be good to go. Good luck with growing your Goji Berry palnt! GHS

  • Reply
    George
    September 12, 2015 at 8:50 am

    Hi I have five goji plants in my garden almost two and a half years,I live in southern greece where summer climate is really hot(no rain fall for over four months)due to my absence all summer surprisingly coming home on the tenth of September I notice that my plants had survived the summer heat without any drop of water and they were full of berries ready for picking.My question is how could I grow more of these particular plants? If I cut branches and leave in a water vase will they grow any roots,when is the best season to take such of action,is there any other formulas that you can suggest me in order for me to multiply my heroic plants.

  • Reply
    sergiu
    September 18, 2015 at 4:51 am

    i have a goji planted in april, it grow a lot during the summer and in september i have some flowers, will it be ready to pick until mid october?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 24, 2015 at 10:47 am

      Sergiu, congrats on your flowering goji plant! Can you tell us what hardiness zone you are growing in?

  • Reply
    Savannah
    October 18, 2015 at 8:47 am

    Hi! I live in ga, and bought a small gogi plant back in jan and potted the plant. It has slowly lost leaves since and I then decided to plant it in the ground last week with only 4 or 5 leaves left. It was watered, gave it some compost occasionaly, and in full sun. The only thing Im ready that I could have done was bumped up my pH some. It seems like it’s struggling/dying. Any suggestions?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      October 19, 2015 at 2:42 pm

      Savannah, can you tell us how big the container was and how often you watered it? GHS

  • Reply
    steve bennett
    November 9, 2015 at 6:19 pm

    How do you tell if you need to fertilize your goji berry? how much to fertilize, what kind, when to fertilize, etc

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      November 11, 2015 at 12:02 pm

      Steve, Goji Berry plants do not like much fertilizer. It is best to test the soil before adding any amendments. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Simone
    March 12, 2016 at 12:05 pm

    Hi I purchased 2 plants in Late January. Planted them in 4 gallon pots. They have taken off and looking wonderful. I live in zone 6 and wondering when I should plant them in the ground?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 28, 2016 at 2:35 pm

      Simone, your Goji Berry plants can be transplanted anytime you see fit. Just keep the soil moist for the first month till they get established. Good luck, GHS

  • Reply
    Jenn
    March 13, 2016 at 12:48 pm

    I have two plants that are 4 years old and due to not knowing hot to care for them they literally have taken over, spread and the one is about 3 feet wide and 10 feet tall. I pruned over the winter to attempt to gain control however should I also thin it out and how do I do that. Is there a way to control the new starts everywhere? Help!!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 28, 2016 at 2:34 pm

      Jenn, Goji Berry plants should be prunned back to control their growth. This also helps it to produce berries since they only grow on new wood. Thinning can be done as you see fit. Good luck, GHS

  • Reply
    Tim
    March 14, 2016 at 2:29 pm

    I live in a cold winter climat , central New York if I have a plant in a container should I bring inside Such as a basement in the winter months or leave it on the deck and should it still be watered ? Thanx

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 18, 2016 at 1:08 pm

      Hello Tim. Your container grown Goji Berry plant should only be brought inside if you have an unheated area that still gets below freezing, otherwise just leave it outside. If brought inside, it should have a little water every few weeks. GHS

  • Reply
    AR Farmer
    March 14, 2016 at 10:51 pm

    Hi! I planted from a non-seed plant, it grows big and I prune it, but the flower never translates into fruits. I have about 4 plants. What kind of special pollinator do they need or other companions that will help them?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      March 18, 2016 at 1:03 pm

      Hello AR Farmer: We will need to know your zip code, if they are growing in the soil or in a container, how often you water them, and what fertilizer you may have used and how often you have used it? GHS

  • Reply
    Marilyn
    March 28, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    My four gojis plants have been in the ground since June, 2012. They are 5 feet tall. The only pruning I’ve done was to remove the unruly canes. Every year there are tons of flowers/bees but in the 3 1/2 years they’ve been in the ground the yield has been four berries. No kidding. Four. They are in full sun and sandy soil. My PH level is 6.8. My zip code is 12306. During the growing season, I water them once or twice a week. I have not fertilized them. I’m about to give up. Any advice?

  • Reply
    Natassia
    March 31, 2016 at 1:33 am

    My goji is growing suckers all over. Just has shoots coming out of the ground from the roots. They all grow straight up and have no lateral branches. Is this normal? This will be its third summer. It winters fine and comes back every spring. It has nice leaves but hasn’t grown flowers or fruit yet.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 4, 2016 at 8:53 am

      Natassia, it is normal for Goji Berry plants to produce shoots. Just keep them trimmed down if you don’t want the plant to expand its territory. Can you tell me how much sun it is receiving? Also, have you been feeding it any fertilizers? Joe

  • Reply
    Erica
    April 1, 2016 at 5:18 pm

    Hi,

    I live east of Phoenix AZ and there are wild Gogi berries everywhere. I’d like to try to grow some at home, but the only ones I can find at the stores are from China. Strange that a plant that is all over the place isn’t available. Any ideas on how I can transplant one from the desert or on planting the fruits to get seedlings? Does this work?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 4, 2016 at 8:51 am

      Erica, the wild plants would be prefect for growing at home. Just find a small shoot that is growing off a larger plant. Dig it up. Try to leave at least 12 inches of the root if possible. Wrap it in a moist towel during the trip back home. Get it in a container or in the ground right away. Once its planted, keep it will watered for at least the first few weeks. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Daniel Basham
    April 2, 2016 at 6:10 pm

    I live in hardiness zone 6. I will be moving to zone 9 in September. I have a one year old goji planted in the ground. I desire to move it to a container when I relocate. Is this possible with success?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 4, 2016 at 8:48 am

      Yes your Goji Berry plant can be moved Daniel. Keep as much of the soil around the plant as possible during the move. Keep it will watered during the time it is in the container. You might loss the berries for this year; however it should come right back for you next year. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Natassia
    April 4, 2016 at 12:15 pm

    It’s planted in a full sun location. I have not given it any fertilizer yet. Is there any that you recommend?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 28, 2016 at 2:15 pm

      Natassia, it is best not to give Gojis any fertilizer. Have you prunned it each year? If not, that could be the issue as fruits are only produced on “new” wood, not last years branches. Good luck, GHS

  • Reply
    Ms. BB
    April 7, 2016 at 8:15 pm

    will this plant grow in zone 4a?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 28, 2016 at 2:17 pm

      Ms. BB, yes Goji Berry plants will grow in zone 4. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Judy Cardwell
    April 17, 2016 at 4:32 pm

    I live in Minnesota in a suburb of Minneapolis and I was told I could grow Goji plants. I would like to grow the vine along a chain link fence. Do you think I could?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 28, 2016 at 2:10 pm

      Judy, Goji Berry plants are good to grow in your area. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Rachael Rowsell
    April 19, 2016 at 10:14 am

    When can I prune the Goji berry plant as I just planted it last summer….didn’t cover it for the winter….now the bush is showing lots of long sticks but no leaves….should I prune it now in the spring?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 28, 2016 at 2:03 pm

      Rachel, you can wait till it starts showing signs of life. Unless it has grown very large in the first year, we would not recommend pruning just yet. GHS

  • Reply
    Natassia
    April 29, 2016 at 11:33 pm

    I have not pruned it. Last summer was its first summer after wintering. This will be its second. I will prune it and hope for the best

  • Reply
    Brooke
    May 2, 2016 at 3:16 pm

    Do deer eat these? If grazed somewhat by deer, will they likely still survive or be demolished? We have quite a few deer in our area, but want to put this in our front lawn.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 3, 2016 at 2:00 pm

      Unfortunately deer will eat about anything if they get hungry enough. With that being said, Goji Berry plants will bounce back if grazed on. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Mitch
    May 7, 2016 at 4:41 pm

    Does watering need to be stopped before August, such as with sour cherry trees, to force the Goji into dormancy so it survives a cold winter???

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 13, 2016 at 10:30 am

      Mitch, watering does not need to stop for the Goji Berry to go dormant for the winter. However it can be reduced once the berries are harvested.

  • Reply
    andrea
    May 12, 2016 at 4:08 pm

    I have a wolfberry bush I live way up north in Montana and I have it in a giant pot very cold winters and it survived its about 3 years old now it produced its first berried last year

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 13, 2016 at 10:28 am

      Congrats on your producing Goji Berry plant Andrea!

  • Reply
    Joyce Sobotta
    May 15, 2016 at 5:18 pm

    I just purchased a Goji plant. I live in northern WI. If I start it in a pot will I bring it in the heated garage over Winter? Or would it be best to plant it in the ground?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 17, 2016 at 1:46 pm

      Joyce, Goji Berry plants need to have a dormancy period. So just let them in an unheated building if still in a container. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Polly Huggins
    May 19, 2016 at 11:50 pm

    I bought 5 plants and transplanted them twice. It’s spot was too shady. One plant died the first year. They have been in this very large garden for three years. They are going like crazy and have evaded the whole flower garden. Full of small flowers on each brach. Should be interesting to see how much fruit I get this year. I am going to dig most of these up and pot them in early fall. They,are evening growing out in my driveway….crazy!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 23, 2016 at 5:49 pm

      Polly, Goji plants do spread if you dont keep the shoots trimmed back. Sounds like they are headed for a good harvest!

  • Reply
    Rita Boyle
    May 21, 2016 at 5:41 am

    I have a goji berry plants by two and not one has flowered any ideas

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      May 23, 2016 at 3:58 pm

      Rita, we need a bit more info before we can attempt an answer. How long have they been planted? How often are they watered? Have you fertilized them? How much sun do they receive? GHS

  • Reply
    jimmy adam
    May 24, 2016 at 12:47 pm

    I have goji but I have let it grow it is now very high should I prune now or wait till the winter it looks very healthy and will I get any fruit this year as I planted it last year

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 7, 2016 at 11:12 am

      Jimmy, I would wait to prune till this winter and the plant has gone dormant. Sounds like you should prune the Goji Berry plant a bit heavier than you have in the past. Happy gardening, Joe

  • Reply
    Scarlette
    June 2, 2016 at 7:32 pm

    My Goji Berry plants are turning yellow and losing leaves. I have done everything exactly as directed and they are in the second season now. I was advised that they might be getting too much water? I spoke to someone at a nursery who said to treat them more like a cactus? She said the mulch would keep the water in and damage them. Please advise if I should do something different. They are in full sun (all day) and they are in soil that is around 6.5. Thank you

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 7, 2016 at 11:08 am

      Scarlette, it sounds like they need a bit more water than you are giving them. Can you tell me if you are using any fertilizer on your Goji Berry plant? Joe

  • Reply
    Josh
    June 5, 2016 at 1:32 pm

    Hi. I have propagated 2 types of goji and I have them in 5 gallon buckets. My question is do these need winter protection being above ground in buckets. I’m in Indiana zone 5b. I want to eventually transfer some to the ground but keep some in buckets. I have around 20 buckets going now. Can you let me know about the winter protection? Also could I transfer some to the ground soon? It’s June 5th here. Thanks!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 7, 2016 at 11:04 am

      Josh, the best thing to do with these containers would be to move them into an unheated building once they gone dormant for the winter. If that is not available, cover them with some type of blanket. Happy gardening!

  • Reply
    Derek
    June 8, 2016 at 8:16 am

    This says the plant will stop growing once roots hit the bottom of the container, is this permanent or will it resume growth once placed in a larger container? I’ve started a few gojis in small pots in my apartment and all have stopped growth and are a manageable size but will be moving to a larger apartment in the next few months and was wondering if larger pots would cause the plants to continue their growth.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 16, 2016 at 8:16 am

      Derek, your Goji plants will grow larger if placed into larger containers. Enjoy your new apartment! Joe

  • Reply
    MARJ2625
    June 10, 2016 at 6:18 pm

    Hello very one i gust got my goji berry today 6/9/16 i live in a apartment what can i do to get them to live in a pot but i can take THEM TO THE PORCH i live in Florida

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 16, 2016 at 8:27 am

      Marj2625, congrats on your Goji Berry plant! They are very easy to grow in a container. Just make sure the soil is not loaded with fertilizer. Then just keep it watered and you will be good to go. Joe

  • Reply
    Raj
    June 10, 2016 at 9:32 pm

    I have one year old Goji berry plant that I moved from a pot to ground and it show happened that the root got exposed.. NOW it seems it is dieing what can I do ?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 16, 2016 at 8:25 am

      Raj, I am not sure why it would appear to be dying. Can you cover it with mulch? How long has it been since being transplanted? Joe

  • Reply
    pat jodarski
    June 11, 2016 at 9:28 am

    I have my plants in the house in sun can they go out on patio hear wont grow in wi

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 16, 2016 at 8:21 am

      Pat, Goji Berry plants should grow in your area. What hardiness zone are you in? Joe

  • Reply
    Joel
    June 19, 2016 at 3:07 pm

    Just got mine in may, it appeared as a stick with some budding leaves and i put it straight in the ground. Now its still just a stick in the ground with no signs of life at all. I have it in sun and i have kept up on watering.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 27, 2016 at 2:06 pm

      Joel, we do ship ours as a bare root, which is what you are describing. If you kept it moist at all time, give us a call and we will send you another. 260-589-3384

  • Reply
    Jim
    June 25, 2016 at 4:45 pm

    I planted a Goji Berry plant last year and it was about 12″ and last summer it grew to 3 feet and this year nothing on top 2 1/2 feet and only putting a few leaves about 3″ from bottom. Any solutions that will be helpful?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      June 27, 2016 at 2:01 pm

      Jim, we need a bit more info. How much sun? In the ground or container? Any fertilizer? How much water? And what hardiness zone are you in? Thanks, GHS

  • Reply
    Sheri
    June 27, 2016 at 2:19 pm

    I was given a Goji plant and it looks dead, only branches, no leaves. Is there any hope for it? It’s in a pot. Thank you. Sheri

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 5, 2016 at 7:56 am

      Sheri, congrats on your Goji start! Go ahead and plant it. Just keep the soil moist at all times. In 3-4 weeks it should start pushing out some leaves. If it doesn’t by that time, its probably not going to make it. Good luck. Joe

  • Reply
    Wendy
    June 28, 2016 at 9:31 pm

    I have a goji berry plant but now having fungus on the leaves. Please give me some advice on how to treat it. I wound prefer not to use any chemicals or pesticides. Thank you

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 5, 2016 at 7:55 am

      Wendy, how old is the plant? How much sun does it receive? And how often do you water it? Joe

  • Reply
    Dave
    July 1, 2016 at 1:23 pm

    The first year my plant had berries,they were fine. The last 2 years they start turning brown or black before they get fully ripe. It has some shade in the morning but mostly sunny. Any ideas?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 5, 2016 at 7:54 am

      Dave, how many hours of sun per day does it receive? Joe

  • Reply
    Cesar
    July 2, 2016 at 8:21 am

    I bought a Gojji Berry plant at a nursery in February ,is growing healthy about 4 feet and has flowers. Will this plant grow into a vine or a bush?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      July 5, 2016 at 7:53 am

      Cesar, Goji Berry plants become bushes. Keep in mind that it flowers on “new” wood only. So there needs to be some prunning each season after it fruits.

  • Reply
    Melanie Cox
    August 6, 2016 at 6:21 pm

    Hi I got two goji very seedlings. I’ve had them over a month now. ..maybe closer to two, but anyways I put them each in their own 5 gallon buckets and made sure it was just potting soil, no peat moss. They’re still very tiny! One I’m not seeing any growth on it, but it’s still very green and I know it’s still alive. The other one is a little bit bigger and has more leaves and it looks like it’s putting out a little leaf or two, but it doesn’t look as green and healthy as the other one. What should I do?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 21, 2016 at 6:59 am

      Melanie, just let it keep growing. If nothing happens in another month, you might want to start over. Good luck, Joe

  • Reply
    Troy
    August 11, 2016 at 12:21 am

    I have 4 plants, they are in the first year are in a green house and about 4ft tall and producing berries in zone 8.

    Some berries are red, when is the right time to harvest?

    I plan on growing these year around, is this possible in a green house?

    The leaves are turning yellow and some are falling off, I water and fertilize weekly with miracle-grow 24-8-16 if I stop fertilizing will the leaves go back to green?

    I would like to fertilize can I use a non nitrogen one? if so what would you recommend?

    Whats the proper way to prune to encourage berries to grow?

    Thanks

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 1, 2016 at 5:50 pm

      Troy, let me try and answer you questions on growing Goji Berries. They can be harvested anytime after they have turned red. These plants must have a dormant period or at least cut all the way back to the ground and allowed to grow new wood before they will produce again. Stop fertilizing, they dont like a lot, and it sounds like you are doing too much. For sure dont use nitrogen. Something like fish emulsion works well in small amounts. Goji berries only grow on new wood, so trimming needs done after every harvest. Good luck! GHS

  • Reply
    Bob
    August 11, 2016 at 12:53 pm

    I planted a goji berry this spring. It has put out one shoot that is over 6 feet long and it’s laying flat on the ground. Should I stake it upwards? It’s almost frightening how fast it’s growing. I could trellis it what’s your recommendation?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 1, 2016 at 5:46 pm

      Congrats on the growing Goji plant Bob! It would be best to trim it back and not just let it grow. Some growers do stake their plants, however it is a very time consuming thing to do and you will always be reworking it as these plants need trimmed on a daily basis. Good luck. GHS

  • Reply
    Twilla spruell
    August 14, 2016 at 5:53 pm

    we have 3 gojo plants and only one is productive but all are planted fairly close to each other like 5 ft apart, what can we do to help production of other two, they have been in ground for 2 yrs

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 1, 2016 at 5:43 pm

      Twilla, do the all receive the same sun and moisture? GHS

  • Reply
    BArry
    August 31, 2016 at 2:41 pm

    Hello. I have Gojiberries that I have planted from seed two years ago. They have yet to fruit, and mine do not look near as healthy or leafy as the ones I see on line. They seem to lose leaves. I seen a few flowers at one time, and one fruit (that was small and black), but for the most part, they just do not look good. In my internet searches, one web sites says this, another says the oppisite, and with all the confusing info, I’m clueless. This page is great, but doesn’t seem to go into a lot of detail, or cover problems. I don’t know where to turn, but I will not give up. I just need someone who can help me get mine up to par. Any help out there?
    thanks
    Barry

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 1, 2016 at 5:34 pm

      Barry, can you tell us how much sun it receives each day, if its growing in the ground or in a container, what the soil pH level is, how often you fertilize and with what, and what your hardiness zone is? Once we have this info we will try and get an answer. Joe

  • Reply
    Lori Lunney
    September 2, 2016 at 2:33 pm

    Hi,
    My goji plant is on its second year and looks great. I weave it in and out of a fence and it’s amazing how fast it grows. Last year I didn’t cut it back and this year I’ve continued to weave. Should I cut it all the way back and take the beaches out of the fencing at the end of Fall or beginning in Spring? It looks pretty, but I want the maximum berries.
    Thanks,
    Lori

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 21, 2016 at 6:58 am

      Lori, keep in mind that Goji Berries only develop on “new” wood. So if you just let it keep growing, there will be less berries compared to the size of the plant. However, the larger plant will still have berries. So you can let it grow for a while and if you don’t like the amount you are getting, you can always cut it back. Good luck, Joe

  • Reply
    MikeWalker
    September 5, 2016 at 1:04 pm

    How do you eat them? I are one raw and it was horrible. I spit it out immediately. I would imagine they’re better as ingredients that you can’t taste. Maybe dry them out? Just curious about how everyday normal people are eating them.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      September 21, 2016 at 6:54 am

      Mike, it might not have been totally ready to pick yet?

  • Reply
    Richelle A Duncan
    December 12, 2016 at 9:04 pm

    What does it mean when you say “Gojis only grow on new wood.” I’m a new grower and want to know all I can about these berries. I’m sick and their nutrient rich berries help me. Thank you and God Bless.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      January 3, 2017 at 12:04 pm

      Richelle, “new wood” means the growth that happens each year. If you cut the Goji back, it will grow new branches in the spring. That would be the new wood. I hope the berries help you get well soon. You are welcome, and thanks for the blessing! Joe

  • Reply
    rani2014
    March 20, 2017 at 7:25 pm

    My Goji berry has become horrible invasive. I have two pots and they have grown out of the pots. The branches which grew over the pots are growing in the soil and the roots are everywhere and so are the shoots. The roots which grew out of the pots are also sending out shoots and root. At present I am digging and have pile about 3 feet high and 7 feet or more long. This is not fun.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 3, 2017 at 9:16 am

      rani2014, the roots do spread. To stop this, grow them in a container that does not have drain holes. Also, the branches do need pruned regularly.

  • Reply
    Melissa
    May 11, 2017 at 10:58 pm

    Hi there!

    I bought a tiny stick sized goji years ago and planted it in a smart pot, we have seen it flower but have never actually gotten any fruit from it! Now that I know more I’m hoping to get some fruit! My concern is that my plant really has no main shoots it seems. When I’m looking at it it seems like every shoot comes from the soil. I just planted it in the ground but I am at a loss on pruning it. Help!

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 10, 2017 at 7:54 am

      Melissa, we will need to know how you fertilize, water, and how much sun it receives to try and answer your questions. Joe

  • Reply
    Janet
    May 12, 2017 at 9:06 am

    I have a friend who plants goji berries and her’s are in bloom right now( may). Mine have been blooming in September and fruit in late October, often too late to get ripe fruit. It is planted in full sun. Is this normal? I wonder why they don’t bloom in the spring like my friend’s who lives nearby?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 10, 2017 at 7:53 am

      Janet, try cutting them back a bit in the spring. This will help the plant to “produce during the summer”. Joe

  • Reply
    Dana
    May 17, 2017 at 3:44 pm

    I am in zone 5 growing my gojis in pots. Last year was 1st year and they 2 of 3 produced about 8 cups of berries. Now the weather is getting beautiful and I’m seeing no sign of life. I did cut one “branch” and its green on the inside. No other pruning has been done. Should I cut them down and hope for new growth or just continue playing the waiting game?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 10, 2017 at 7:52 am

      Dana, are you growing in a container or in the ground?

  • Reply
    Lois Usselman
    May 31, 2017 at 7:15 pm

    If I plant in container, can I over winter in garage in zone 4.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 10, 2017 at 7:50 am

      Lois, in order to have the best chance at success, it would have to be an unheated garage. Joe

  • Reply
    Marilyn
    June 10, 2017 at 9:44 pm

    I am looking to purchase vines I saw advertised. We live in zone 4 Wisconsin. It’s June now. Could we order some and keep pots outside and bring them in for the winter and wait to put them in the ground next year? We are moving in three years and are hoping to harvest berries next year or at the latest in the second year before we move. Should we keep them in a pot to assure berries sooner?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 10, 2017 at 7:45 am

      Marilyn, keeping them in a pot will not make them produce berries any sooner. I would go ahead and plant them in the ground now. When you are ready to move, just dig up the roots you want and leave the rest there. It might take a year before they start producing once moved but will make a nicer plant overall. Joe

  • Reply
    Sharon
    June 11, 2017 at 5:33 pm

    Thanks! I needed help with ph. I’m at 6300 ft. in the desert. Goji grow up here.
    I blundered through two years with a bare root start in a pot and accidentally did things correctly. Oh, no! It froze. Brought it in and BERRIES. Pruned to keep it out of the curtains and it did it again.
    Hint: If you’re growing inside, get a watercolor paintbrush. When you see a flower, gently brush. You’ll see the pollen. Spread it from flower to flower.
    Now, my big baby is in the ground and I’m growing babies from seeds.

  • Reply
    Vangie
    July 26, 2017 at 2:48 pm

    I have four goji berry plants but two of them their leaveas are lighter green than the others?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      August 10, 2017 at 7:36 am

      Vangie, if the are all growing well, I would not be concerned at this time. Lets wait and see how they produce. Joe

  • Reply
    Cori
    August 11, 2017 at 7:40 pm

    Hi –

    I have a couple dozen or so rooted goji berry cuttings that I’d like to plant out. My site is sunny and well drained, mostly clay soil, Mildly acid pH, and I’m in Middle Tennessee in Zone 7. We have hot humid summers and freezing winters, but usually little or no snow cover.

    My question is, should I go ahead and plant them out now, or overwinter them in pots and plant out in the spring? I know they are very hardy, but never having grown them before I want to get it right, as I am really anticipating the harvest. I love goji berries. 😉

    Thanks, Cori

  • Reply
    linda kolb
    August 15, 2017 at 7:41 am

    Our Goji is in its third year. It is gorgeous ! Loaded with berries.
    I eat them straight from the vine.Will begin training it to climb.
    I purchased it online as a bareroot.plant.Following instructions to let it soak for fifteen minutes.
    Have had remarkable luck with it.
    We live in zone 4.Southern Illinois.

  • Reply
    Diana McLean
    September 17, 2017 at 12:50 am

    My first time growing my goji berry plant. It is September and some of the leaves on the long stem of my plant are falling off, why? It is getting cold here in southeastern Montana, do I bring my plant inside for cover it?

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      December 12, 2017 at 6:15 pm

      Diana, you do not need to bring your plant inside. If you do, it should be in an unheated building as it requires a period of dormancy. Good luck, Joe

  • Reply
    Teresa
    September 25, 2017 at 4:52 pm

    I planted a Goji berry plant this year, in the ground on the east side of my home. It’s grown like crazy and has been bearing fruit. The first one I’ve tasted almost tasted like a underripe tomato bell pepper mix. I spit it out too, but it may not have been ripe enough. I get impatient. And I also think I was expecting more the “sweet berry” taste! I live in zone 3 and was wondering about the best way to winterize it? I never put mulch down, but after reading here I will have to do that.

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      December 12, 2017 at 6:14 pm

      Teresa, they are not “sweet” like you think about a strawberry or other fruit. It may have been a bit under ripe? You can trim it back some and let it go for the winter. No special mulching is needed as they are very hardy once established. Good luck, Joe

  • Reply
    Larry Huguley
    October 31, 2017 at 2:20 pm

    Do Goji plants have to go through a dormancy stage. I have 4 plants in 5-gallon pots. Can I take them and put them under grow light during the winter bring them back out in the spring? Or should I put them in a cool basement for the winter? Or will they be fine outside. Was wondering if the roots would freeze and harm the plant. Lows around this area average around 22 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit,

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      December 12, 2017 at 6:08 pm

      Larry, Gogi plants need a period of dormancy. A cool spot in an outside building would be best. Good luck, Joe

  • Reply
    leon
    January 25, 2018 at 9:22 pm

    I Have a Goji shrub in its third season ,I pruned it heavily at the end of last season ,it has produced masses of flowers which have turned to berries but the berries are not growing to full size but are stunted and prematurely drying on the plant and as such are inedible .

  • Reply
    Chris Johnson
    March 3, 2018 at 10:31 pm

    I have a 3 year old Goji which is healthy and productive with slight pruning. I am amazed that no-one complains of its invasiveness. This year I have pulled out as many as fifty plants growing as far away from the parent plant as 5 metres. It is a constant battle.
    Chris

    • Reply
      jstutzman
      April 3, 2018 at 9:28 am

      Chris,

      It sounds like you have a healthy plant! Yes, they will spread if the conditions are right, so as you prune, trim off the new shoots that may appear around the plant.

      Happy gardening, Joe

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